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Please tell me about the experiences that have whittled away at you - the things you’ve seen, heard, felt, and imagined that have transformed you into the person who is standing in front of me now.

What ideas have you given life to, and which ideas are most firmly rooted in you? And which ideas have you abandoned?

And do you sleep well at night?

When was the last time you laughed at yourself?

Tell me about your relationship to the world, to God, to others, and to yourself.

When you look at a clock, do you see its shape and color before you notice the time, like I do? Or maybe you see its transparency because you know precisely how each cog and gear interlocks beneath its face? Or do you instead hear its steadfast tick as the pulsing heartbeat of the universe?

Please tell me.

My internship is over this week, so I made this as a parting gift.

My internship is over this week, so I made this as a parting gift.

To future Kevin, when you’ve won the lottery.

So, you’ve won the lottery.

You finally have enough money to bail yourself out of jail for creating art! Celebrate! One of your life goals is one year away from fruition.

Follow these instructions and don’t spend it all on something stupid:

Spend the next year on a body of work that consists of 6-8 public sculptures. Prepare each one with sketches, studies, the whole shebang. Keep the end result in mind throughout this entire process.

Then, go out into the streets and just start building. You’re so bad about documentation, so GET SOMEONE TO DOCUMENT YOU. Keep building until the police arrest you (probably for public disturbance or vandalism). And at the moment they arrest you, your piece is done. Have a friend document the resulting sculpture as images before it is torn down.

Pay your bail, get back into the studio, and start planning your next sculpture.

At the end of the year, have a show exhibiting this year long tug-o-war with the law. Each sculpture will be a different piece, and each piece can consist of many elements:

- Preliminary sketches and preparation

- Documentation of the sculpture, as it is being worked on

- Documentation of the sculpture at the moment you’re arrested

When you are preparing for a new sculpture, consider:

- relationship between artist and law

- temporality in the public space

- the space (as installation)

- the process (as performance)

- arbitrariness of the moment of “completion”

Oh, and go tithe.

@jimmy: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shebang?s=t

If I could, I would give you the world

because a mind like yours is voracious

and should never be denied a view from the peak of Kilimanjaro,

or the coziness of a late-night cafe in Lisbon.

I would give you the world

because eagles should never be caged.

Because I see freedom in your eyes

and feel the breeze in your flights away from home.

I would give you the world

because I understand that you were not created to be still.

Have you ever, in a dream, felt an emotion you’ve never felt while awake?

Last night, I dreamt that I had a boyfriend. He didn’t have a name, and as far as I can perceive, he was not a manifestation of any one person I know. He may have been an amalgamation of many personalities in my life, or I may have completely invented him.

Anyway, the dream ended with our relationship ending; more specifically, my dream ended with him breaking up with me. His words were deafening and paralyzing. 

I’ve never been in a serious relationship, so I’ve never had my heart broken in that way. I suppose the capacity for that emotion has always existed inside of me, I’d just never felt it until this morning.

This is what terrifies me slightly, though: the ethereal feeling of heartbreak wasn’t the only remnant that infiltrated its way from the dream world into my reality. I woke up with one particular lyric incessantly repeating in my mind - “I know it ain’t easy, giving up your heart..

Things I’ve learned from being a retail sales associate for 16 days-

(In no particular order)


1. You begin to see the cost of every day objects in hours of work. You get a parking ticket- “Damn, that’s 8 hours of work.”

2. Paying with paper cash is way faster than paying with a credit card. I used to think that paying with a credit card expedites the process of checking out, but after working as a cashier, I realize that isn’t the case at all.

Situation A, someone pays with a credit card- A surprising number of customers will stumble and fumble and flounder around their wallets or purses, as if they’re navigating them for the first time, but this applies to both card and cash. After the customer finds the card, they’ll hand it directly to me, awkwardly forcing me to make obvious to them the pinpad on the counter that is literally, smack-dab in front of them. But approximately 70% of these customers just glaze over it. So, they recoil their arm in shame. Then swipe, then enter their PIN number, and then send a text message or look at the cute little erasers next to the register. Wait no, that shouldn’t be right…but that’s what they do! They think that everything is concluded and dandy. Nowadays, pinpads will not let you leave with your items before they ask you for a signature , offer you cash back options, allow you to donate to some children’s charity/make you feel bad about not donating to some children’s charity, ask you to confirm your total, or blah blah. In one transaction, I have to prompt the customer two, sometimes three times because they were too preoccupied to read the directions on the pinpad entirely.

Situation B, someone pays with cash- Stumble, fumble, flounder. They find their cash, and they count it. Turns out, many customers pay with big bills- 10s, 20s, and not much with 1s and 5s. (It just occurred to me that this is probably because virtual currency is so prevalent now. We don’t carry cash, and when we do, they’re 20s from the ATM. Whoa..) And forget about paying with exact change. Who are you, my grandmother’s grandmother? Anyway, 10s and 20s make counting the money easier for both them and me. Then, it’s up to me to give them their change. I’m free to do so as rushed or unhurried as I please, unless a manager is watching. And good thing cash registers display exactly how much change to tender. Otherwise, I’d be standing there with my abacus all day. OH, and the register begins printing the receipt as I’m counting change, so once I’m done, it’s ready for me to pluck.

Wow, that became more of a rant than I’d intended.

3. Time passes much faster if you make customer service into a game- not so much a game, per se, since there are no points and no real winner, but whatever. In the Initial Greeting Phase, before they’ve spoken a word to me, I try to assest their facial expression, posture, stance, and predict what type of customer they will be. There are countless types - understanding, impatient, timid, appreciative, foreign, etc. but my favorites, by far, are the ones that, when asked if they have any questions, promptly say “No (automated defense)…………….actually, I do have one question.”

The Service Phase is an unspoken power struggle. Yes, we’re here to serve customers, but they can’t treat us like servants because we have the information they need

And of course there’s the entertainment of just observing humans- their quirks, mannerisms, and behaviors can be so interesting.

4. The long spiels that sales associates give about promotions. coupons, and events- they’re mandatory. We don’t say them because our mouths are bored- secret shoppers expect us to recite our spiels to every customer we ring up. Ours at Blick is currently, "Did you find everything okay? Just so you know, if you had trouble finding anything, you can go to our website and we can help you special order items from there. Please kill me. Also, check out a catalogue- our holiday sale is happening right now. And we have an event on the Friday after Thanksgiving. There’ll be raffles and giveaways and sales all day! The cake is a lie."  So, I guess my point is, the next time a worker spiels at you, be patient and pretend like you care. We have to say it 30 times a day, you can hear it a couple of times.

5. Coworkers share a very special bond that stems from an understanding of the crappiest aspects of working there. I’m sure this is the same regardless of where you work, or what you do. Customers and bosses will always be common enemy.

Please tell me about the experiences that have whittled away at you - the things you’ve seen, heard, felt, and imagined that have transformed you into the person who is standing in front of me now.

What ideas have you given life to, and which ideas are most firmly rooted in you? And which ideas have you abandoned?

And do you sleep well at night?

When was the last time you laughed at yourself?

Tell me about your relationship to the world, to God, to others, and to yourself.

When you look at a clock, do you see its shape and color before you notice the time, like I do? Or maybe you see its transparency because you know precisely how each cog and gear interlocks beneath its face? Or do you instead hear its steadfast tick as the pulsing heartbeat of the universe?

Please tell me.

My internship is over this week, so I made this as a parting gift.

My internship is over this week, so I made this as a parting gift.

To future Kevin, when you’ve won the lottery.

So, you’ve won the lottery.

You finally have enough money to bail yourself out of jail for creating art! Celebrate! One of your life goals is one year away from fruition.

Follow these instructions and don’t spend it all on something stupid:

Spend the next year on a body of work that consists of 6-8 public sculptures. Prepare each one with sketches, studies, the whole shebang. Keep the end result in mind throughout this entire process.

Then, go out into the streets and just start building. You’re so bad about documentation, so GET SOMEONE TO DOCUMENT YOU. Keep building until the police arrest you (probably for public disturbance or vandalism). And at the moment they arrest you, your piece is done. Have a friend document the resulting sculpture as images before it is torn down.

Pay your bail, get back into the studio, and start planning your next sculpture.

At the end of the year, have a show exhibiting this year long tug-o-war with the law. Each sculpture will be a different piece, and each piece can consist of many elements:

- Preliminary sketches and preparation

- Documentation of the sculpture, as it is being worked on

- Documentation of the sculpture at the moment you’re arrested

When you are preparing for a new sculpture, consider:

- relationship between artist and law

- temporality in the public space

- the space (as installation)

- the process (as performance)

- arbitrariness of the moment of “completion”

Oh, and go tithe.

@jimmy: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shebang?s=t

If I could, I would give you the world

because a mind like yours is voracious

and should never be denied a view from the peak of Kilimanjaro,

or the coziness of a late-night cafe in Lisbon.

I would give you the world

because eagles should never be caged.

Because I see freedom in your eyes

and feel the breeze in your flights away from home.

I would give you the world

because I understand that you were not created to be still.

Have you ever, in a dream, felt an emotion you’ve never felt while awake?

Last night, I dreamt that I had a boyfriend. He didn’t have a name, and as far as I can perceive, he was not a manifestation of any one person I know. He may have been an amalgamation of many personalities in my life, or I may have completely invented him.

Anyway, the dream ended with our relationship ending; more specifically, my dream ended with him breaking up with me. His words were deafening and paralyzing. 

I’ve never been in a serious relationship, so I’ve never had my heart broken in that way. I suppose the capacity for that emotion has always existed inside of me, I’d just never felt it until this morning.

This is what terrifies me slightly, though: the ethereal feeling of heartbreak wasn’t the only remnant that infiltrated its way from the dream world into my reality. I woke up with one particular lyric incessantly repeating in my mind - “I know it ain’t easy, giving up your heart..

Things I’ve learned from being a retail sales associate for 16 days-

(In no particular order)


1. You begin to see the cost of every day objects in hours of work. You get a parking ticket- “Damn, that’s 8 hours of work.”

2. Paying with paper cash is way faster than paying with a credit card. I used to think that paying with a credit card expedites the process of checking out, but after working as a cashier, I realize that isn’t the case at all.

Situation A, someone pays with a credit card- A surprising number of customers will stumble and fumble and flounder around their wallets or purses, as if they’re navigating them for the first time, but this applies to both card and cash. After the customer finds the card, they’ll hand it directly to me, awkwardly forcing me to make obvious to them the pinpad on the counter that is literally, smack-dab in front of them. But approximately 70% of these customers just glaze over it. So, they recoil their arm in shame. Then swipe, then enter their PIN number, and then send a text message or look at the cute little erasers next to the register. Wait no, that shouldn’t be right…but that’s what they do! They think that everything is concluded and dandy. Nowadays, pinpads will not let you leave with your items before they ask you for a signature , offer you cash back options, allow you to donate to some children’s charity/make you feel bad about not donating to some children’s charity, ask you to confirm your total, or blah blah. In one transaction, I have to prompt the customer two, sometimes three times because they were too preoccupied to read the directions on the pinpad entirely.

Situation B, someone pays with cash- Stumble, fumble, flounder. They find their cash, and they count it. Turns out, many customers pay with big bills- 10s, 20s, and not much with 1s and 5s. (It just occurred to me that this is probably because virtual currency is so prevalent now. We don’t carry cash, and when we do, they’re 20s from the ATM. Whoa..) And forget about paying with exact change. Who are you, my grandmother’s grandmother? Anyway, 10s and 20s make counting the money easier for both them and me. Then, it’s up to me to give them their change. I’m free to do so as rushed or unhurried as I please, unless a manager is watching. And good thing cash registers display exactly how much change to tender. Otherwise, I’d be standing there with my abacus all day. OH, and the register begins printing the receipt as I’m counting change, so once I’m done, it’s ready for me to pluck.

Wow, that became more of a rant than I’d intended.

3. Time passes much faster if you make customer service into a game- not so much a game, per se, since there are no points and no real winner, but whatever. In the Initial Greeting Phase, before they’ve spoken a word to me, I try to assest their facial expression, posture, stance, and predict what type of customer they will be. There are countless types - understanding, impatient, timid, appreciative, foreign, etc. but my favorites, by far, are the ones that, when asked if they have any questions, promptly say “No (automated defense)…………….actually, I do have one question.”

The Service Phase is an unspoken power struggle. Yes, we’re here to serve customers, but they can’t treat us like servants because we have the information they need

And of course there’s the entertainment of just observing humans- their quirks, mannerisms, and behaviors can be so interesting.

4. The long spiels that sales associates give about promotions. coupons, and events- they’re mandatory. We don’t say them because our mouths are bored- secret shoppers expect us to recite our spiels to every customer we ring up. Ours at Blick is currently, "Did you find everything okay? Just so you know, if you had trouble finding anything, you can go to our website and we can help you special order items from there. Please kill me. Also, check out a catalogue- our holiday sale is happening right now. And we have an event on the Friday after Thanksgiving. There’ll be raffles and giveaways and sales all day! The cake is a lie."  So, I guess my point is, the next time a worker spiels at you, be patient and pretend like you care. We have to say it 30 times a day, you can hear it a couple of times.

5. Coworkers share a very special bond that stems from an understanding of the crappiest aspects of working there. I’m sure this is the same regardless of where you work, or what you do. Customers and bosses will always be common enemy.

To future Kevin, when you’ve won the lottery.
Things I’ve learned from being a retail sales associate for 16 days-
Working 7 days a week..

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